HOW FLUORESCENT LAMPS WORK

//HOW FLUORESCENT LAMPS WORK

HOW FLUORESCENT LAMPS WORK

How Fluorescent Lamps Work

 

The central element in a fluorescent lamp is a sealed glass tube. The tube contains a small bit of mercury and an inert gas, typically argon, kept under very low pressure. The tube also contains a phosphor powder, coated along the inside of the glass. The tube has two electrodes, one at each end, which are wired to an electrical circuit. The electrical circuit, which we’ll examine later, is hooked up to an alternating current (AC) supply.

When you turn the lamp on, the current flows through the electrical circuit to the electrodes. There is a considerable voltage across the electrodes, so electrons will migrate through the gas from one end of the tube to the other. This energy changes some of the mercury in the tube from a liquid to a gas. As electrons and charged atoms move through the tube, some of them will collide with the gaseous mercury atoms. These collisions excite the atoms, bumping electrons up to higher energy levels. When the electrons return to their original energy level, they release light photons.

 

SOURCE: HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM

By | 2016-05-03T10:12:00+00:00 May 3rd, 2016|Blog|0 Comments

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